3 March 2010

13.8 kg snatch:
100 left/101 right

In case you are wondering, 13.8 kg is a traditional Russian measure of weight used before 12th Century. It is derived from... Joking. I have a wrong style 12 kg KB, and after tying a 1.25 kg barbell plate to it with the medical plaster it weighed 13.8 kg. Progression a la McRobert, using childrens' weights. So far seems ok, just another 10 kg and I'll be proud of myself!

24 kg OAJ
switching hands every minute at 10 reps/min
10 minutes/100 reps. Not easy. Should do it more often.

I am nursing my left calf therefore not getting onto my toes during jerks. It makes it a little harder.

4 comments:

Sergei said...

Eugene, I've been a rheumatoid arthritis sufferer for almost 15 years, went through couple of instances of rheumatic fever, got few major joints "frozen" in pain: right knee, right shoulder, right ankle, left hip. Little over a year ago I started working out with light 16k bells and managed to work off most of the residual pain and stiffness in the damaged joints. Удалось "закачать" поврежденные суставы. I was doing mostly swings and snatches. This was a small miracle for me, I now believe that high volume low-to-medium weight with whole body complex moves like GS jerk, snatch or LC is the best way to train and maintain your body. This is how I got interested in GS, and decided to train a bit more seriously. If something bugs you - drop the weight, increase volume, review technique. You can always attack that level later. We have all the time in the world. Just don't push too hard and don't give up. Good luck.
Sergei.

Eugene said...

Sergey, thanks for the comment. Your story is amazing, truly amazing. I agreethathigh volume low(er) weights is more beneficial for older trainees. Controlling the ego is the single most important measure to prevent injury. From time to time I need to feedmine though, as well as whine about the consequences later :) Thanks again for the comment, it's very true.

Sergei said...

Eugene, I hear you out. When I sometimes blast out a heavy session, it definitely triggers catabolic inflammatory reaction. I guess my leukocyte count spikes up and I feel that all familiar burning sensation in all affected joints. I was lucky, so far it never fired up full blown rheumatic process that can only be stopped with a good dose of steroids. It sort of dies out by itself few days later as I recover. But I do have the same ego problem, given that now I have more strength and gas, and do want sometimes go farther than I should. I have to watch myself not to cross that fine line. This makes progress much slower than I think I am capable of. I always feel I can do better and get there faster. I guess it's not the case any more and it is painfully hard to admit. But better safe than sorry. Good luck to you, take it easy and don't give up.
Sergei.

Tommy D said...

"If something bugs you - drop the weight, increase volume, review technique. You can always attack that level later. We have all the time in the world. Just don't push too hard and don't give up."

I think this the best advice you can give anyone starting out with GS training. I've done this a few times myself, and always come back stronger (physically, mentally, and in terms of technique). Two years ago I thought I'd have much higher numbers with heavier weights by now than I do, but I'm not too bothered by it. I keep my long term goals vague now on purpose, and instead focus on consistent, quality training.